Health Care Programs

FVCC offers a diversity of health care programs.
Find the right program for you.

Time program takes to complete

Required math & science courses

Level of direct patient care

Certified Nursing Assistant

EMT

Emergency Medical Technician

Health Care Office Management

Medical coding student at front desk of hospital

  • 24 months
  • M 120: Math with Health Care Applications or BGEN 122: Business and Allied Health Math; AHMS 208: Health Care Statistics; BIOH 104: Basic Human Biology
  • None
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Licensed Practical Nursing

  • 12-24 months
  • M 120: Math with Health Care Applications; BIOH 104: Basic Human Biology
  • Frequent
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Medical Assistant

  • 12 months
  • M 120: Math with Health Care Applications; BIOH 104: Basic Human Biology; AHMA 220 Phlebotomy; CHMY160: Pharmacology; BIOH 113: Human Forms and Functions
  • Frequent
  • learn more or watch video
Medical Coding

Medical coding student at front desk of hospital

  • 24 months
  • M 120: Math with Health Care Applications or BGEN 122: Business and Allied Health Math; BIOH 104: Basic Human Biology
Medical Laboratory Technology

Female lab worker

  • 12-24 months
  • M 115: Probability and Linear Math; CHMY 121: Introduction to General Chemistry; CHMY 123: Introduction to Organic Biochemistry; BIOB 160: Principles of Living Systems: BIOM 250: Microbiology of Health Sciences
  • Frequent
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Paramedicine

  • 12-24 months
  • M 120: Math with Health Care Applications; BIOH 104: Basic Human Biology
  • Frequent
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Personal Trainer

Personal-Trainer

  • 6-12 months
  • M 120: Math with Health Care Applications; BIOH 104: Basic Human Biology
  • Occasional
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Physical Therapist Assistant

Physical Therapist Assistant

  • More than 24 months
  • M 120: Math with Health Care Applications; BIOH 201: Human Anatomy & Physiology I; BIOH 211: Human Anatomy & Physiology II
  • Frequent
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Radiologic Technology

  • More than 24 months
  • M 95: Intermediate Algebra; BIOH 201: Human Anatomy & Physiology I; BIOH 211: Human Anatomy & Physiology II; AHXR 108: Introduction to Radiologic Physics
  • Frequent
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Registered Nursing

  • 12-24 months
  • M 120: Math with Health Care Applications; CHMY 121: Introduction to General Chemstiry; BIOH 201: Human Anatomy & Physiology I; BIOH 211: Human Anatomy & Physiology II; BIOM 250: Microbiology for Health Sciences
  • Frequent
  • learn more or watch video
Surgical Technology

Surgical Tech

  • 12-24 months
  • M 120: Math with Health Care Applications; BIOH 201: Human Anatomy & Physiology I; BIOH 211: Human Anatomy & Physiology II
  • Frequent
  • learn more

So you are thinking about going back to school to train for a career in health care, but you’re not sure where to begin.  After all, health care is a vast field comprised of many different professions… nursing, paramedicine, physical therapy, radiologic technology, surgical technology, medical assistant, personal training, and the list goes on.  Which profession is right for you?  Identifying the optimal health care field might seem overwhelming at first, but by answering a few simple questions, you can narrow in on the best options for you.

How long do you want to be in school?

Some health care programs, such as EMT licensure training, require as few as six months of school, while other programs, such as registered nursing, require more than 24 months. Finding the right program for you might depend upon how much time you can devote to being a student.

How much college-level math and science
do you want to take?

Some health care programs require students to complete rigorous math and science courses, while others require minimal math and science. Even if math and science aren’t your strongest subjects, you shouldn’t shy away from a program because it requires you to take challenging courses. FVCC offers a variety of free academic services, such as tutoring and labs, to provide students with extra assistance when they need it.

What level of direct patient care would you be comfortable with on a day-to-day basis?

If the sight of blood makes you queasy, you can probably rule out fields such as nursing, medical lab technology, and paramedicine. But there are plenty of other fields that don’t involve working with bodily fluids, such as health care office management, medical coding, patient relations specialist, and pharmacy technology.

Ultimately, the best way to find the right health care program for you is to talk with a knowledgeable academic advisor. Complete the following form and an advisor will contact you soon.